First Black Woman Olympic Gold Medalist Alice Coachman Davis Dies

The first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal, Alice Coachman Davis, has died at the age of 90.

Coachman Davis, a US track and field legend, set a new Olympic record at the 1948 London Games, winning gold in the high jump.

She died in a hospital near her home in Albany, Georgia, on Monday, three months after suffering stroke.

Mrs Coachman’s athletic achievements pre-dated the civil rights era, which meant she was barred from public sports facilities because of her colour.

Coachman also excelled in the indoor and outdoor 50 m dash and the outdoor 100 m dash.
Coachman also excelled in the indoor and outdoor 50 m dash and the outdoor 100 m dash.

At the age of 16, she won her first national title and went on to win 25 track and field championships before retiring at the age of 25, after winning the Olympic gold medal.

Coachman was treated as a national heroine on her return by boat from London, and was honoured with a long motorcade ceremony in Georgia.

However, the black and white audience were segregated at her official ceremony in Albany.

“Alice Coachman Davis has inspired generations of athletes to be their best and she will be missed,” US Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun said in a statement.

Alice Coachman Davis Dies In Her Hometown of Albany Georgia Aged 90.
Alice Coachman Davis Dies In Her Hometown of Albany Georgia Aged 90.

In the 2004 interview on her career, Mrs Coachman reflected that she could have won even more Olympic medals, were the 1940 and 1944 Games not postponed because of World War two.

1 COMMENT

  1. May her soul rest in peace. I hope our thieving sports administrators see how serious people keep well researched and detailed records.

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