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ARAB SPRING: Tunisia Signs New Constitution In Big Step Toward Democracy

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Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki and the head of the National Assembly on Monday signed the country’s new constitution, officially adopting a charter that is one of the country’s last steps to full democracy after a 2011 uprising.

Tunisian President Marzouki holds a copy of the country's new constitution after signing it in TunisThe country’s national assembly had on Sunday approved the new constitution, three years after the overthrow of the North African country’s long-time ruler Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali.

“With the birth of this text, we confirm our victory over dictatorship,” Marzouki said in a speech to the assembly, before signing the document which he embraced, waving the victory sign. “Much work remains to make the values of our constitution a part of our culture,” he added.

The vote by an overwhelming majority of assembly members marks another crucial step to getting the democratic transition back on track in the birthplace of the Arab Spring.

Tunisia’s new constitution and progress contrasts sharply with messy transitions in Libya, Egypt and Yemen which are still caught up in turmoil after ousting their own long-standing leaders in 2011 revolts and uprisings.

It came close on the heels of an announcement by Mehdi Jomaa, the prime minister, of a new caretaker cabinet to govern the country until elections. The new constitution, seen as one of the most progressive in the region, guarantees equal rights for men and women.

It also demands that the state protect the environment and tackle corruption.

Executive power is divided between the prime minister, who will have the dominant role, and the president, who retains important prerogatives, notably in defence and foreign affairs.

Islam is not mentioned as a source of legislation, although it is recognised as the nation’s religion and the state is committed to “prohibiting any attacks on the sacred”, while freedom of conscience is guaranteed.

There has been criticism that the constitution has not banned the death penalty. There are also restrictions on freedom of speech, and attacking religion and accusing people of being nonbelievers is illegal.

To recall, widespread discontent at economic hardship, decades of autocratic rule and corruption erupted into mass demonstrations in December 2010 after a young, unemployed man, Mohamed Bouazizi, set fire to himself after officials stopped him selling vegetables in Sidi Bouzid. Around 300 people were killed during the subsequent unrest, which forced Ben Ali to resign in January 2011, after 23 years in power, and go into exile in Saudi Arabia. He was later sentenced to life in prison in absentia.

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Eniola Badmus fires back at troll who body-shamed her

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Popular comic actress, Eniola Badmus has fired back at a troll who tried to make mockery of her body for wearing bikini.

The troll asked the actress why everything about her has fallen.

“Why everything come fall for up?,” the troll commented on the actress’s photo on LIB’s Instagram page with crying emoji.

And she replied: “Just the way your mama own fall”

The actress also complimented her own photo, writing that “looking good is a good business.”

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We Need N81 Million To Cut Grass In Abuja Stadium: Nigerian Minister

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The Minister of Youth and Sports Development, Sunday Dare has revealed that it will cost the ministry N81m to cut the grass and clear the weed that have taken over the MKO Abiola National Stadium in Abuja.

He stated this recently while speaking during the one-day seminar organised by the Sports Writers Association of Nigeria (SWAN) FCT chapter.

According to him, the ministry approached the Abuja Environmental Protection Board (AEPB) for assessment in the stadium, which was built in 2003 with N53 billion on a 29 hectares (72 acres) of land.

The stadium is divided into Package A which houses the Main Bowl and Package B which houses other facilities like basketball courts, NFF office, volleyball courts, tennis courts, squash courts.

“We approached AEPB to come see what can be done to clear the grass and weed in the stadium and they told us it will cost us N81m.

“If we tell Nigerians we used N81m which is not even available, there will be an outcry. The funds are not really there for us and that is why we are partnering with private investors to bring back the key components of our infrastructures,” he said.

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It’s smart if a man refuses to date a jobless woman in Nigeria — Leo DaSilva

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Ex-Big Brother Naija housemate, Leo Da Silva recently got internet users debating afte he waded into a conversation centered on men refusing to date women who are not financially stable.

A lady who disclosed that she’s a student, had tweeted;

I’ve seen tweets from guys saying they can’t date a girl that’s not financially stable. I’m a student. But never, like never have I felt attacked by such tweets. What’s actually up with some guys on Twitter? What I want must not make sense to you. It’s choice boo

Reacting to this, Leo stated that it’s a smart choice for young men to refuse to date jobless women. He added that guys should have their own preference just as women have theirs.

He tweeted in response;

Guys should have their own preference just as women have theirs. Dating someone that’s not working or doesn’t have adequate allowance is a burden. Nigeria, the poverty capital of the world, if a young man trying to come up refuses that burden, I think it’s a smart choice.

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